voyeur project

Little known fact—My career in visual arts started quite early, in the 80s, in photography. Like many of my contemporaries, I was loaned a 35mm camera by my parents and improvised a lab in the cellar at home. I stole my mom's baking trays and used a candle under the table as 'lab light'.

During the 80s, I probably spent more hours shooting and developing than I did in high school. But as soon as I started working, photography took a back seat to other things visual. My photo spirit showed up here and there in shoots (I must be hated by every photographer I ever collaborated with—if you are one of them, my apologies.)

Recently, however, I bought a camera and took it on again. It's amazing how different a tool a camera is, freed from the constrains of the limited number frames, single ISO 'setting' and (in the case of mirrorless) agility and portability.

I went back to the streets, shooting random people. It's a funny thing—people don't seem to remember that phones are cameras too. You can shoot anything with a phone, and people are careless. But a camera, even a small mirrorless, is another thing. It makes people wary. I started shooting people from the hip, holding the camera with my hand partially blocking the lens, which makes people doubt and insecure. I like best the frames that capture expressions of annoyance and doubt, as people wonder if they are being shot…

What do you think?

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If you have a business challenge that calls for creative might, I'd like to hear from you.

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